Reach Machu Picchu via Different Paths

Machu Picchu is one of Peru’s most-visited sites. A 15th-century ancient citadel, Machu Picchu attracts upwards of 5000 individuals a day during the high season, with a million people visiting on a yearly basis. If you want to see this wonder for yourself, then you’ll need to find a path that allows you to reach Machu Picchu.

Ways to Reach Machu Picchu

Tucked away in the northwest of Cusco, Peru, Machu Picchu has been noted as a sacred site for some, and a royal estate for many. It’s a place that only a privileged few have had the benefit of seeing in person, with the site stretching over a five-mile distance, featuring more than 3000 steps that link all of the different levels.

  • Machu Picchu is located almost 8000 feet above sea level.
  • During your hike, expect rains. The location is warm and humid, with temperatures reaching between the mid-50s and 80s Fahrenheit.
  • Noted as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, Machu Picchu is a travel destination for people all over the world.
  • Machu Picchu – which means “old mountain” in the native Quechua language – is actually divided into two unique sections, Hanan and Urin, according to ancient Incan tradition.

The Inca Trail tends to be the focus of many hikers. Even though it is a hike that will expose tourist to the unique topography of the Peruvian mountains, it may be a challenging trail for some people. Thankfully there are alternative routes that are just as impressive.

Salkantay represents one of the sacred peaks of Incan society, with it being revered in Andean religion. The hike is mule-assisted and goes through the Mollepata Valley at an altitude of 15,000 feet. You’ll be exposed to the full diversity of Macchu Pichu’s ecosystems, with the trail ascending into subtropical cloud forests. However, due to its diverse terrain, it may be a difficult hike for some.

The Lares Route is one of the more arduous hikes that spans over 60 hilly miles. It’s the perfect hiking trail for seasoned hikers and a dedicated first-timers. The first leg of the trek consists of traversing through the Apurimac River canyon, which leads to the Choquekiraw, ruins that are reminiscent of Macchu Pichu. Some of the routes overlap the original Incan highways. The 7 to 13-day trip will have you traversing mountain ranges, rivers, and valleys.

To learn more about different ways to reach Machu Picchu, get in touch with Alpaca Expeditions. Alpaca Expeditions is a Peruvian travel operator with a main office in located in Cusco, Peru, and we are the top-rated tour operators of the Inca Trail.

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